Ridgiedidge Apiary - Pure Honey from Contented Free Range Country Bees

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Feral Hive in Possum Box

Bees clustering over the front of a possum box in the fork of a tree. Another view of Bees clustering over the front of a possum box in the fork of a tree. Another view of Bees clustering over the front of a possum box in the fork of a tree.
As can be seen from this series of 3 photos this possum box had become the home for a feral hive that had grown too large for the box. No doubt the hive originally took over the box as an early season swarm.

Feral Hive in Letter Box

Photo 1 - The letter box with the lid removed.

Photo 2 - Looking inside the letter box where the polystyrene box is located at the base of the column.

Photo 3 - The polystyrene box.
Photo 1 - The letter box with the lid removed. Photo 2 - Looking inside the letter box where the polystyrene box is located at the base of the column. Photo 3 - The polystyrene box.

Photo 4 - Showing the side of the white polystyrene box containing the hive material, bees and comb. Photo 5 - A temporary brood box placed on top of the letter box to collect the field bees and bees removed from the polystyrene box. The photo shows a large number of bees covering the top of the letter box and the hive entrance.
Background

When the letter box was constructed a polystyrene box was used to form up the base of the box and to fill the bottom cavity prior to construction of the top section. This swarm had entered the letter box and gained entry to the polystyrene box where they constructed their now feral hive. 
Photo 4 - The polystyrene box containing the hive. Photo 5 - A temporary brood box placed on top of the letter box to collect the field bees and bees removed from the polystyrene box.

the Bees Loved this Barbeque

Bees in BBQ Bees in BBQ Bees in BBQ
When the owner of this barbeque decided to cook some lunch she got more than she bargained for!  The bees had constructed comb under the cooking surface and around the gas switches. Three hours later the beekeeper returned the barbeque to almost new although now with a slight smell of honey.

Compost Bin

The lid has been removed from the compost bin to reveal the feral hive. Photo (left) - The compost bin with the lid removed to reveal the feral hive.  Comb was built on top of the compost as well as attached to the underside of the lid.

Photo (right) - The exhaust of this car was an unusual resting place for an early spring swarm.

Car Exhaust

Bees on car exhaust pipe

Feral Hive behind the Wall of a House

A gap between the timber wall panelling and brickwork of a house provided an ideal entrance for a swarm of bees to establish a colony in the wall cavity. As the colony grew the bees gained access to the bedroom through a small gap in architraving creating a few problems for the residents. As a result a builder was called to remove the timber panelling with the assistance of our beekeeper who then safely removed the bees and hive material.
Wall of house
Photo 1 - Timber panelling below bedroom window.
Wall of house
Photo 2 - Timber panelling showing edging strip on the left against the brickwork.
wall of house
Feral hive behind wall of house Photo 4 (left) - The timber panelling was removed to reveal the extensive amount of hive material.  Photo 3 (above) - Close up of the edge of the timber panelling. The bees can be seen entering the wall through the gap between the brickwork and the timber edging.

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Ridgiedidge - Australian slang for original or genuine article